GINGERBREAD HOUSE RECIPE TUTORIAL How To Cook That Ann Reardon
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GINGERBREAD HOUSE RECIPE TUTORIAL How To Cook That Ann Reardon


Welcome to How To Cook That, I’m Ann Reardon,
and today we are going to make this beautiful gingerbread house complete with two storeys,
lights inside this area, we’ve got lollies inside this half, a tree and there’s even
a little pond out the back. And also, yes we’re doing a giveaway so you have a chance
to win one of two of these Breville stand mixers and you can enter from wherever you
are in the world, I’ll put a link below to the website where the entry form is. And you
can also win one of 10 of the gingerbread house moulds which is the mould that I’m going
to use today to make this one. So click on the link below so that you can go and fill
out the entry form to enter there for that one. Also as well in a couple of weeks time
I’m going to be doing a meet and greet in Melbourne so if you want the details of that
and where to come and meet me click below, I’ll put a link saying Meet and Greet Melbourne
so you can get all the details of that one. So the first thing we need to do is make our
dough and for that we need golden syrup, plain or all purpose flour, butter, brown sugar,
ginger, nutmeg, cinnamon and cloves. And I had a lot of people asking last year can I
leave out the ginger, yes you can you can change these spices completely they are just
for flavour so make it how you want it to be. You can get all of the ingredient quantities
on the howtocookthat.net website and I’ll link you to that below.
Add the spices, brown sugar and the butter into the bowl with the golden syrup.
Mix those together on low speed until they are well combined, that will take just a couple
of minutes. Then gradually add in the flour and mix until
you have a smooth dough. Split your dough into three and set two of
those aside. Then cut the one you have in half, then in half again. Then cut across
those once more so that you’re going to make eight even pieces of dough. Take two of the
wedges and roll them into a ball. Cut each one of those in half again. Then add those
little pieces onto four of your wedges so you end up with four bigger portions and two
smaller ones. The two smaller ones are for the walls and the larger ones are for the
roof. Just push them into the silicon mould pressing down using you hands to make sure
you get right to the edges. Now if you don’t have one of these moulds I’ll also put a template
on the website and if you’re just using that you can just roll out the dough and cut around
the template instead. Use the palm of your hand to flatten out the back so it’s nice
and smooth. Then slide that onto a baking tray and bake
in the centre of the oven. Take the other two portions of dough and press them into
the two end wall sections. We are going to make a larger house today so we are going
to bake this three times so that’s why we had the three portions of dough and then we
are going to put it all together to make the one big house. When you are baking the second set, don’t
make one of the roof sections because we don’t need one of them. We are going to use some
of that dough to make a door instead. Then when you make the third one make all the walls
and roof like we did the first time and use the leftover dough from the second one to
make another door so we end up with two doors. Once they are baked and golden brown tip them
out of the silicone mould and with set cut off the top of the end walls and then we also
want the little triangles off the very top. So trim them off too so you end up with two
little triangles and two rectangle walls there. And if you cut this while it’s still hot it
will be soft enough to cut, you may also need to straighten up the top edge of the side
walls as well because sometimes that spreads a little bit in the oven and you want it to
be straight. With your next set, tip it out and using the template trim one of the end
walls to make it smaller, we will use this for the archway out the front. Then take one of the roof pieces and cut out
two rectangles and this is for the roof of that archway section. So that it fits together
nicely at the top you need to cut it on a downwards angle going inwards so that once
it’s cut it sits nicely together. If you want to you can also take a knife and
cut out the windows and this is good if you want lights inside the house. So you should end up with all of these pieces
plus 2 doors and the front archway. To make the royal icing, which is kind of
like the glue that holds the whole gingerbread house together, you need icing sugar, you
need some powdered egg white or if you can’t get that you can use the pavlova magic mixes
and you need some water. And all you do is put it all into the bowl of your stand mixer
… noisy, noisy, noisy … the egg white or I’m using the pavlova magic mix, a little
bit of powder there, and the water. And then turn that on just on low. That looks good
and then once that’s looking like it’s all moist then you can turn it up onto high speed.
Beautiful. And that looks great, so see how it’s just
holding it’s own shape there so when we pipe the sides of the gingerbread house it’s all
just going to hold together. Place some of the icing into a piping bag
and use it to join these walls together for the two story part of the house. So you are
joining an end wall that we cut the top off with another end wall. Two side walls, another
two end walls and another two side walls. Run a teaspoon along to take off the excess
icing and then leave them to dry overnight. If you are in a hurry you could use compound
chocolate to join these instead so you don’t have to wait overnight. I don’t want a window on the second story
of this one but I accidentally cut it out already so I am just going to fill that one
in because that is where the roof slope join will be.
Take about half of your icing mix and add in a little bit of colour to make it a creamy
colour or you could make it pink or whatever colour you want your walls to be.
Outline around the top half of the walls making sure you get into the bumps on the gingerbread
and outline around the windows too. Add some water into the leftover coloured
frosting and mix it until it is about this consistency, it should be about the thickness
of honey. Spoon that onto the wall and spread it out
all over the whole area, just like you’re plastering it or rendering the outside of
a house. And this is what the outline was needed for. It just stops the icing from running
off the edges of the wall which means we can get a nice flat, even coating of the colour. For the bottom half of the wall I am going
to use a brick texture mat and I got this one in a kids book – I’ll put a link to that
below as well. Pour some white chocolate on the top, then
use a palette knife just to scrape it off so that the white chocolate is just down in
the brick indents but not on the top. Let that set then spoon dark chocolate over the
bottom half of the house or you could use milk chocolate whatever you prefer – I just
love chocolate-coated gingerbread. Neaten up the edges and then add the bricks to the
top, pressing down to make sure you’ve got rid of any air bubbles. Once it is set just peel the texture mat off
and then cut the extra chocolate out of the windows and we have a nice brick wall. Turn the four roof pieces upside down and
cover the backs and sides of them in chocolate and we want to do that with the little roof
pieces for the archway as well. It is quite hard to ice the underside of the roof once
it is in place on the house so doing it now will be a bit quicker and a bit neater. Pour the rest of the chocolate onto some non-stick
paper and spread it out thinly, making sure you temper your chocolate if it has cocoa
butter in to or you could use compound chocolate. There is a video on the How To Cook That youtube
channel that explains tempering and all the difference between real chocolate and compound
chocolate for you. Once it is starting to set run a pizza cutter
along making straight lines and straight cuts so that we can make roof tiles. Now they don’t
have to be an exactly the same size because I want it to be a little bit rustic so just
roughly cut them so they’re all little rectangles. For the windows place some isomalt into a
saucepan and just heat over high heat until it melts.
Once it is melted pour it into the windows and make sure you have some foil underneath.
Once they are cooled just peel them off and the isomalt will be solid and clear. You can
also do this using sugar or melted candies but it doesn’t work as well or last as long.
So that you can see the difference some of the windows on the two storey one I’ll do
them out of sugar. Place then end wall and two side walls to
one side of your board. So just lay them out how you want them to be. And then pipe some
frosting along the joins going up two of the walls and along the base. Then lift up your pieces and put them into
place. Add some more icing along the centre join
and then put the end wall without the top window here with the finished side facing
into the inside of the house that you’ve already done.
Now you will need to put a cup or something inside for a little while just to support
it. Cups are a good idea because they’ve go the handle sticking out so you can kind of
lean that on the wall without the base of it touching the icing. Then add extra icing
to the inside corner joins to strengthen them. Add frosting down one side and across the
base and add in the next two storey wall and again you’re going to need a cup to support
that into place. Do the same on the opposite wall and then the end wall. And you’ll need to leave those for about 30
minutes so that they’re firm enough to take the cups out before we put our roof on. Add icing along the top of the wall and up
one side and place one half of the roof into place. And then where it is meeting on the
wall there add your little triangle for support. Add the other side of that roof. And then
at the front you can add a tiny bit of gingerbread from one of the off-cuts to extend the roof
around the join. Now for the second storey roof it’s the same
thing. Just pipe icing all the way around the top. Add one half of the roof into place
then put icing across the top for the middle join and then add the other half. Support
your roof while it sets so it doesn’t slide off. You can use cups or you can use like
spoons secured onto the counter with blu-tack like I’ve got here, whatever you need just
to hold it gently in place until it’s firm. Line up the front section and measure up where
the triangle needs to sit and put it into place using some icing. Then to hide the joins
on the front of the house I am using sour candy you could use licorice or whatever you
have that is sort of in this long shape just to hide where the joins are. Add icing to top of the archway and to the
base of it. And put it into place, put some icing on the top of the triangle and then
add the roof for that section. Use your coloured icing just to neaten up
the sides here and also neaten up any of the joins on the house where you can still see
the gingerbread or if it looks a bit messy. For the roof tiles, to join them on, just
add some chocolate and then just add the tiles going across, starting from the base and working
your way up to the top of the house. You could use candy for this instead. When I am decorating
a house with the kids each person just gets one side of the house and you can decorate
it however you like. It’s your house so just go crazy. For the front of the archway trim two candy
canes so they are just a little curved at the top. And then cut them to the right height.
Cut the third one to make the middle little bit of the archway and add them into place
just using some icing. For the window sills take some cherry ripe and cut small pieces
then add them to the base of the windows. Take some green soft candy I am using a mint
leaf here, and cut out chunks from it and cut out triangles so that you are left with
lots of little spiky bits so it looks a bit like a plant. Add that onto the wind sill
just using a little bit of chocolate to attach it. For the Christmas lights roll a long snake
of fondant and then add fruit Tic Tacs or other small candies evenly spacing them along.
If you just use a little bit of water on the back of the candy it will make it stick to
the fondant. Then drape those lights across the top of
the house. Again just using a tiny bit of water to make the fondant stick. Add another
string of lights to the other side and keep that going around the top of the house. Now for the garden. Melt some marshmallows
in the microwave on high for about 2 minutes. Pour in a cup of rice bubbles and stir it
really well. Rice bubbles are the same as Rice Crispies, they are just called a different
thing here in Australia. Then add another cup and stir that through
and finally a third cup and stir that through and you’ll get a nice sticky mixture like
this. Add it to the ground on the side of the house,
now if you wet your fingers it will stop it sticking to you. And then use it to hold two
chocolate bars joined together for the tree trunk towards the back of the house. You can
put it where you want, I just wanted mine at the back. And a t the back make a circle section as
well, so leave a little down area for the pond if you want one of those too. So mound
it up around the side and leave it in the middle. For the tree, make a big mound for
the top of it and then smaller bits to go underneath so that it isn’t totally flat on
the bottom. On the single story part of the house, add
some growing up the side of the wall like it’s ivy and you can make it go up and around
the window if you want. You can make it as crazy as you like. Take some milk chocolate and add it along
the edge of the board and the garden all the way around. Then take some coconut and add
green food colouring to make it look like grass. Add chocolate over the rest of the
area and then sprinkle the coconut over the top to give a nice green grass area. Take some more chocolate and pipe it messily
up and down the chocolate bar so it looks like bark. You can extend it down a bit to
make it look like it’s roots going into the grass as well as you want.
Colour some white chocolate with oil-based food colouring or you could use coloured royal
icing for this instead. And cover the tree parts completely. Also use it to cover the ivy that is growing
on the side of the house. And I’m just using a clean paintbrush and just brushing it on.
With the ivy section, once it is starting to set just dab it again with a paintbrush
just to make it a little bit rougher and finer than the tree so it has a different texture. Once the top is set turn it over and make
an indent for the trunk. Then add the smaller bits to the base so that it has a bit more
of a rounded shape underneath instead of being flat.
And add that into place. If you want lights inside put those in now,
leaving the cord on the outside of course so we can turn them on and off. You may need
to cut a tiny bit off the corner of the door to accommodate the cord coming out and then
just put the door into place and you can hide that cord under the coconut.
In the other half I want to add lots of chocolates instead of lights. I like it when you open
up a gingerbread house and it has treats inside. Put some chocolate along the entrance and
then add candies of your choice to make the path. Then make some blue jelly or jello just using
the directions on the packet but only using half of the water that it says. And let it
cool to room temperature and then pour it in to the pond. And then to finish it off all you need to
do is sprinkle a little bit of icing sugar on it for snow. I like to use a tea strainer
to do this because then you really control where it’s going and how much you’re getting.
Not that it snows in Australia at Christmas time but because we see so many movies where
it does at Christmas time snow we still kind of associate snowy Christmases with a nice
Christmas. Don’t forget to click on the link below for
your chance to win one of the Breville stand mixers or one of the gingerbread house moulds
which as you know I used to make this one so you can get your own one of those. I’ll
also put a link as to where you can buy those if you just want to get one of those as well.
Special shout out to Lisbeth whose birthday it is this week, thankyou for the lovely letter
and the gift that you sent me. And if any of you happen to live in Melbourne make sure
you click on the link below to find out where you can come and meet me and say hi, I love
meeting all of you guys, that’s one of the highlights in all the things that I do. Subscribe to How To CookThat for more cakes,
chocolates and desserts . Click here to go the YouTube channel, here for the recipe for
the gingerbread, here for the Clash of Clans cake from last week and here for more gingerbread
house recipes. Make it a great week and I’ll see you all
on Friday.

About Earl Carter

Read All Posts By Earl Carter

29 thoughts on “GINGERBREAD HOUSE RECIPE TUTORIAL How To Cook That Ann Reardon

  1. Merry Christmas everyone, want to see my latest Gingerbread house? Here's the link 🙂 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ueTlim-VD14

  2. If she put snow on the roof why did you put grass and a tree if it was really snowing the tree would not have very many leaves and the grass would not be that green

  3. I live in Australia, too, it’s really bad because it doesn’t snow at Christmas, or really ever. This will be the first time my mum and I don’t make a gingerbread house at Christmas because we’re going to New Zealand. Still, last year my mum and I made a gingerbread house using your recipe! It was delicious! Thanks for your dedication, Ann!

  4. How do I get a stencil for the arch and roof for the porch?? Or is it fine to free hand make one for this? Thank you in advance- I can't wait to try this!

  5. OK, you don't "cook a gingerbread house", you bake it, make it and decorate it.
    Sorry, I just had to say that. I do love your video.

  6. I just discovered your channel❣️ I’m enjoying your gingerbread houses 🏠 how wonderful. I never thought about the molds. Your explanation was very helpful and detailed. Very easy to follow. Thank you so much. I look forward to more videos. 💜😊⛄️

  7. This is my tradition to watch this every beginning of Dec to end of Jan for christmas
    This gets me into a little bit of the Christmas spirit

  8. Wooden shingles (sawn) or shakes (split) tend to have a ratio of three to one and laid so that all but the lowest row has has triple coverage. (The first row is laid with two to one shakes/shingles.)

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